A Poisoned Legacy

A carved wooden mask is on display in the Metropolitan Museum of Art on Fifth Avenue in New York City, in Gallery 746. According to the Met, it was made and used by the Alutiiq/Sugpiaq people of northern North America and “collected” from them in about 1870. The image is now part of the Met’s Read More

COVID-19 in the Context of Sacred Commemorations

This week, of all weeks — and this week of this particular year, of all years — is one that should stir into waking life a visceral understanding of Indigenous values, deep within the hearts of people of the dominant culture. For this week commemorates events during which individuals set aside their own personal fears Read More

Paradox

Spiritual ways of knowing are keyed to the great paradoxes humans face: the complementarity of light and darkness, illness and health, life and death. That the best of our existence is interlaced with perilous and tragic events challenges any sentient being, and it is often in spirituality that we find expression of the mysterious, unspeakable Read More

The Power of Story: Procrustes in the Land Between the Mountain and the Sea

Last fall I had the great privilege of making a keynote address to the Center for Culturally Responsive Evaluation and Assessment at their meeting in Chicago, Illinois. Although I developed my presentation on different ways of knowing and the ways that contemporary practices of assessment relate to them with that audience in mind, this particular Read More

Painting Our Children Into a Corner

I learned something horrifying today about one of the things children are taught to do in some horse therapy programs. Here’s a picture to show you. They paint the horse. That’s right. They are taught that a horse is a “perfect canvas.” They paint things that help them process difficult emotions, which is good standard Read More