Hunkering Down with the Horses

The wind came rolling down the canyon, rustling the pines and then spreading out along the flattened area where the horses would normally be grazing. We had been told a big snow storm was coming, perhaps even a blizzard. I had put hay in the two barns, hoping to encourage the horses to seek shelter in either one. Instead, I watched as the horses moved in a way that looked like they had been assigned places in the pasture. As if choreographed by some voice I could not hear, they turned their hindquarters to the wind. Then, they dropped their heads low, almost reaching the ground. They stood close enough to be companionable but not in a way that any of them touched each other. Then, they waited. There was no anxiety among them. No frantic whinnying. No white-eyed fear. They knew, deep in their bones, what to do. Turn away from the storm, drop their heads to protect their eyes and ears and noses from the wind and snow, and wait it out. The horses knew the storm would end.

I have learned many things from horses during my 20 years of researching the horse-human relationship from within Indigenous worldview, and I will be sharing many of them on this blog. One of the most important things I have learned is to listen to the horses. Listening doesn’t mean just with the ears. It means listening to their entire being, to their herd, to the way they interact with life without projecting anything onto it. I have seen horses react in stressful situations such as evacuating from a wildfire. I have seen them need to be removed from fencing in which they have gotten tangled. I have seen them give birth, and I have seen them die. They have lessons they can teach us for this time of pandemic. The one I write about today is to be quiet, go inward, and know that the storm will end.

Mustangs, horses of the Land, were especially made to weather storms. Their tails have a very low set, which allows it to cover the space between their back legs, keeping them warm. They have smaller ears, meaning there is less surface area to allow heat to escape. They grow thick coats that catch snow and ice on the ends of their fur and keeps their skin warm and dry. These are the tools they have, and they use them successfully because where they live, there are no barns and rarely any trees under which to shelter.

The horses teach us how we can weather the COVID19 storm. The biggest thing they are teaching us, a lesson that many people still are having a hard time listening to, is to hunker down and wait it out. Not to panic but to do the things we know we need to do until the storm is over. The horses don’t see storms as a disruption to their lives. They recognize that storms are a part of life. Illness is a part of our lives. It always has been. We have become complacent due to modern medicine but COVID19 is a wake-up call. We now have the opportunity to adjust our lives when this storm passes so that we learn how to live with and survive the storms of illness.

We have the ability to weather this storm because we can stay in our homes until this storm is over. We can work from home or we can take this time and do the things we always say we are too busy to do. We can read, exercise, talk to friends and family via the Internet, write poetry, learn a musical instrument, and the list goes on. If we are essential and must work outside the home, then we can come back to it as the safe haven that it is. We have the tools to hunker down. We simply need to recognize them and use them.

When the horses hunkered down for that storm in their pasture, they didn’t know how bad it would be or when it would end. They simply knew that no matter how bad it got, it would end. While we know that this pandemic will become a severe storm, a blizzard, we also know that it will end. And when it does, we will be changed, individually and as a herd. What we do with that change is up to us. Hopefully, we will learn from the horses so that we will be prepared for other storms.

Heroes in a time of pandemic

Stories in all the worlds’ spiritual traditions tell us of great spiritual heroes who found treasures of incalculable worth in situations most of us would consider unbearably tragic and painful. In the process of doing this, they gave us all another great gift: that of understanding the true nature of reality and the potential for growth that lies in every situation — even one that is tragic and painful. Heroes find treasure in monsters’ lairs, love in a wasteland, hope in the moment of utter despair, life in the belly of death. Treasure, hope, love, and life exist in a time of pandemic. Be heroic.

Circling Back Home

Twelve years ago this month, we had to leave our beloved ranch in Northwestern Nebraska. The programs that we ran on the land there were life-changing for people who participated. While it was incredibly hard to leave, we had no choice because of the financial consequences of the wildfire that had swept through the ranch the year before. We never imagined we would be lucky enough to come back to that area, an area we love and that people found so powerful through our meetings and workshops.

But life has a funny way of working. It seems to like circles, which is appropriate given our model using the Sacred Circle. This month, Tapestry is relocating back to Northwestern Nebraska. We aren’t located at our former ranch. We are actually working on finding a new land partner in this area.

The world has changed a lot in the decade-plus that we have been away from this area. If anything, our mission is even more important than it was before. Some change has been good. Indigenous knowledge has gained prominence in mainstream media, and people are paying attention to Indigenous voices in many endeavors, including climate change and land conservation. In other ways, the news is not so good.

Along with our relocation, we have new programs to address the changes in the world. Our IKhana Fund provides financial support to people engaged in projects of reciprocal, relational knowing to acquire Indigenous Knowledge that can help communities adapt to changing environments and that can help preserve and protect environments threatened by catastrophic change. The Horse-Human Relationship Program continues to grow with Horse Ibachakali and Mindfulness with Mustangs, providing opportunities for people to connect with horses — and the natural world — using mindfulness and within Indigenous worldview. Finally, we will have exciting news this month about our journey to find a new land partner.

We want all of our friends and supporters to know how much your kind words and support have meant all these years. It’s thanks to you that we are back in the Place that supports our work and that will allow us to move forward with our programs. Stay tuned for more exciting information about our programs. Remember to join us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter to follow our work. If you want to support our work financially, all donations are tax-deductible.

Nature is not a resource

Canada recently announced it is holding an international summit in April concerning the protection of nature. I was excited about the announcement because I believe that nature needs all the protection it can get nowadays. I eagerly clicked on the announcement. When I read the first sentence, I froze. It reads, “Nature is our most precious resource.”

My heart sank as I realized that this summit would be just one more meeting where people talked about protecting nature but nothing resulted from it. Why? Because the most important first step in protecting nature is realizing it is NOT a resource. The definition of resource states it is “a stock or supply of money, materials, staff, and other assets that can be drawn on by a person or organization in order to function effectively.” Nature is not something to be drawn upon by others. It is not an asset. It is a living entity. We enter into relationship with nature. What that means is there is reciprocity between us. Nature provides the means by which humans and all life exists but we also need to think of what we give back in return for those things. When a person thinks about a resource, he or she thinks about using that asset but does not consider what he or she will give back in return. Using the term “resource” diminishes nature and fails to recognize the relationship we have with nature.

If we are to truly protect nature, we must first change our relationship with it and recognize the reciprocity we have. We must learn to regard it as the wise, living entity it is, not as a “resource” for humanity’s needs.

— Jo Belasco, Esq.

The Horses Need Your Help to Help Other Humans!

In this season when the light returns to the world, please help us provide new sessions of Horse Ibachakali to the many people who are in need of its healing power. This unique program of mindfulness, Indigenous worldview, and Mustangs re-establishes connection to the natural world, to other human beings, and to our own bodies — the root of wellness and well-being. It does this through sessions that integrate Indigenous worldview, mindfulness, and Mustangs in an empowering experience that transforms individual human lives. Learn more, and find out how you can help the strong and compassionate mustangs of Horse Ibachakali respond to the needs of the many people who have wanted to feel their touch once again. Your generous year-end donation, which supports the horses and staff, and provides scholarship assistance to those in need, is tax-deductible.